Idiorhythmic

cypulchre:

al brady - plasma rifle

Greg Semkow - cyberpunk girl

Khyzyl Saleem - ensalve

FJF Toledo - from light to darkness

Maciej Drabik - cyberpunk district

A reminder that I don’t have enough cyberpunk in my life right now.

crescentmoonmountaintop:

dynastylnoire:

bitter-alien:

buttholevegan:

stealth-liberal:

theadvocatecorner:

Amber Alert: FBI join search for children after mom’s body found shot dead in vacant Detroit, Michigan house June 6th, 2014Alicia Fox, the 27-year-old mother had been shot multiple times, twice in the head and was wrapped in blankets and hidden underneath a door.The location of her two children, Kaylah Neveah Hunter, age 6, and Kristian Dejuan Justice, 6 months, remains unknown. Detroit police described Fox’s daughter, Kaylah, as 4-foot-7, 65 pounds, with a light complexion and black hair in cornrows. Police did not release a physical description of the baby Kristian Justice.Police are looking for Fox’s burgundy Chevy Impala, which has a license plate of CCR 1286.Anyone with information is asked to contact the Detroit Police Department’s Criminal Investigations at (313) 596-1240 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-SPEAK-UP or 911.

Please, people, PLEASE… this has WAAAAAY too few notes. If you follow me, please reblog this. These babies are in danger and the 6 year old has to be traumatized.

They finally made this an Amber alert or are the cops still not doing shit about them???? But please keep a look out for these babies!!

!!!!

https://www.facebook.com/missingcases/photos/a.300837909936550.73088.212865135400495/853921101294892/?type=1&theater
STILL MISSING!!!!!

signal boost!

crescentmoonmountaintop:

dynastylnoire:

bitter-alien:

buttholevegan:

stealth-liberal:

theadvocatecorner:

Amber Alert: FBI join search for children after mom’s body found shot dead in vacant Detroit, Michigan house June 6th, 2014

Alicia Fox, the 27-year-old mother had been shot multiple times, twice in the head and was wrapped in blankets and hidden underneath a door.

The location of her two children, Kaylah Neveah Hunter, age 6, and Kristian Dejuan Justice, 6 months, remains unknown. Detroit police described Fox’s daughter, Kaylah, as 4-foot-7, 65 pounds, with a light complexion and black hair in cornrows. Police did not release a physical description of the baby Kristian Justice.

Police are looking for Fox’s burgundy Chevy Impala, which has a license plate of CCR 1286.

Anyone with information is asked to contact the Detroit Police Department’s Criminal Investigations at (313) 596-1240 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-SPEAK-UP or 911.

Please, people, PLEASE… this has WAAAAAY too few notes. If you follow me, please reblog this. These babies are in danger and the 6 year old has to be traumatized.

They finally made this an Amber alert or are the cops still not doing shit about them???? But please keep a look out for these babies!!

!!!!

https://www.facebook.com/missingcases/photos/a.300837909936550.73088.212865135400495/853921101294892/?type=1&theater

STILL MISSING!!!!!

signal boost!

wolvensnothere:

jellyfishdirigible:

unknownbinaries:

These are for sale, 25$ each, they’re 4x6in, and I can fit two in a standard greeting card envelope before possibly having to add more than a normal stamp for weight, so, free shipping in the States and like 2$ elsewhere.

OMG WHY ARE THESE SO BEAUTIFUL

Because unknownbinaries is awesome.

Creepy pretty!

thepeoplesrecord:

Meet the Native American grandmother who just beat the RedskinsJune 18, 2014
The woman who was the driving force behind the cases that led the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office to cancel the federal trademarks for the Washington Redskins Wednesday is 69-year-old grandmother and longtime Native American activist, Suzan Harjo. 
"Suzan has been fighting this since 1992. Native American people have been fighting this since 1972. … The reason it has come up recently is because Suzan has worked really hard to bring this in the public eye," Amanda Blackhorse, one of the five Native American plaintiffs in the case filed before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, told Business Insider.
"She’s just a tremendous woman. She’s a strong Native American woman, and I’m so happy to have met her and to have been a part of all this because this is what we need to do," Blackhorse added. 
Harjo was born in Oklahoma and is of Cheyenne and Muscogee ancestry. In a conversation with Business Insider shortly after the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office’s decision was announced, Harjo said she became involved with political activism while she was still in school.
"One time when I was in school, I was selected by our Cheyenne leadership to come to Washington with them. And when my family asked, ‘Why do you want her to go?’ They said, ‘Because she talks good and she ain’t afraid of nobody.’ So, those became resumé items," Harjo recounted. 
In high school, Harjo was inspired to fight against what she describes as “racist stereotypes in American sports” because of an Oklahoma Native American activist named Clyde Warrior.
"He made a personal cause of getting rid of the mascot ‘Little Red’ at the University of Oklahoma," Harjo said of Warrior. "Most of the Indians in Oklahoma couldn’t stand ‘Little Red’ and we called him the dancing idiot. He was always portrayed by a white guy in Indian costume."
Little Red was eventually banished by University of Oklahoma President J. Herbert Hollomon in 1970.
According to Harjo, activists involved in the effort to eliminate Native American mascots always viewed the Washington Redskins football team as “the worst” offender.
"No matter where you went or what was the mascot fight of the moment in any locale, everyone would always say, ‘And the worst one is right there in the nation’s capital, the Washington team name,’" said Harjo. "It was the worst one, everyone pointed to it."
Harjo moved to Washington D.C. in 1974. Soon after her arrival, she said someone gave her and her husband tickets to a Redskins game.
"We’re football fans and we can separate the team name from the game, so we went to a game. And we didn’t stay for the game at all, because people started — someone said something, ‘Are you this or that?’ So, we started to answer, then people started like pulling our hair," explained Harjo. "And they would call us that name and it was very weird for us. So, we just left and never went to another game."
Harjo said her experience at the Redskins game “solidified” her opposition to stereotypical Native American sports mascots.
"That just solidified it for me because it wasn’t just namecalling, it was what the name had promoted," Harjo said. "That’s the example of what objectification is. You strip the person of humanity and they’re just an object and you can do anything.
You can pull their hair! I wouldn’t even touch someone else!”
Harjo, who eventually became the first president of the Morning Star Institute, a D.C.-based national Native rights organization, began looking for ways to change the Redskins name. She said she settled on the strategy of trying to get the team’s trademark canceled after she was contacted by a Minneapolis lawyer named Stephen Baird in 1992. 
According to Harjo, Baird was working on a law review article about his theory the Redskins’ trademark could be canceled based on a section of the U.S. Trademark Act prohibiting trademarks that “may disparage … persons, living or dead, institutions, beliefs, or national symbols.” Harjo said Baird heard she had “looked at all sorts of causes of action, and not settled on any of them, and had been talking with various attorneys about ways that we could approach this.” When Baird called her, Harjo said his “first question” was why she rejected using the Patent and Trademark Office as a forum to fight the Redskins name.
"And I said, ‘I have no idea what you’re talking about,’" Harjo remembered with a laugh. "Once he explained his theory, I was so intrigued by his theory. It was very different from the kinds of things we’d been looking at. … It didn’t interfere with free speech, it wasn’t even forcing a decision. What it’s saying is, ‘Here’s what the federal government will or will not sanction.’ Because, it’s the federal government’s role to grant the exclusive privilege of making money off this name."
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

Meet the Native American grandmother who just beat the Redskins
June 18, 2014

The woman who was the driving force behind the cases that led the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office to cancel the federal trademarks for the Washington Redskins Wednesday is 69-year-old grandmother and longtime Native American activist, Suzan Harjo. 

"Suzan has been fighting this since 1992. Native American people have been fighting this since 1972. … The reason it has come up recently is because Suzan has worked really hard to bring this in the public eye," Amanda Blackhorse, one of the five Native American plaintiffs in the case filed before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, told Business Insider.

"She’s just a tremendous woman. She’s a strong Native American woman, and I’m so happy to have met her and to have been a part of all this because this is what we need to do," Blackhorse added. 

Harjo was born in Oklahoma and is of Cheyenne and Muscogee ancestry. In a conversation with Business Insider shortly after the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office’s decision was announced, Harjo said she became involved with political activism while she was still in school.

"One time when I was in school, I was selected by our Cheyenne leadership to come to Washington with them. And when my family asked, ‘Why do you want her to go?’ They said, ‘Because she talks good and she ain’t afraid of nobody.’ So, those became resumé items," Harjo recounted. 

In high school, Harjo was inspired to fight against what she describes as “racist stereotypes in American sports” because of an Oklahoma Native American activist named Clyde Warrior.

"He made a personal cause of getting rid of the mascot ‘Little Red’ at the University of Oklahoma," Harjo said of Warrior. "Most of the Indians in Oklahoma couldn’t stand ‘Little Red’ and we called him the dancing idiot. He was always portrayed by a white guy in Indian costume."

Little Red was eventually banished by University of Oklahoma President J. Herbert Hollomon in 1970.

According to Harjo, activists involved in the effort to eliminate Native American mascots always viewed the Washington Redskins football team as “the worst” offender.

"No matter where you went or what was the mascot fight of the moment in any locale, everyone would always say, ‘And the worst one is right there in the nation’s capital, the Washington team name,’" said Harjo. "It was the worst one, everyone pointed to it."

Harjo moved to Washington D.C. in 1974. Soon after her arrival, she said someone gave her and her husband tickets to a Redskins game.

"We’re football fans and we can separate the team name from the game, so we went to a game. And we didn’t stay for the game at all, because people started — someone said something, ‘Are you this or that?’ So, we started to answer, then people started like pulling our hair," explained Harjo. "And they would call us that name and it was very weird for us. So, we just left and never went to another game."

Harjo said her experience at the Redskins game “solidified” her opposition to stereotypical Native American sports mascots.

"That just solidified it for me because it wasn’t just namecalling, it was what the name had promoted," Harjo said. "That’s the example of what objectification is. You strip the person of humanity and they’re just an object and you can do anything.

You can pull their hair! I wouldn’t even touch someone else!”

Harjo, who eventually became the first president of the Morning Star Institute, a D.C.-based national Native rights organization, began looking for ways to change the Redskins name. She said she settled on the strategy of trying to get the team’s trademark canceled after she was contacted by a Minneapolis lawyer named Stephen Baird in 1992. 

According to Harjo, Baird was working on a law review article about his theory the Redskins’ trademark could be canceled based on a section of the U.S. Trademark Act prohibiting trademarks that “may disparage … persons, living or dead, institutions, beliefs, or national symbols.” Harjo said Baird heard she had “looked at all sorts of causes of action, and not settled on any of them, and had been talking with various attorneys about ways that we could approach this.” When Baird called her, Harjo said his “first question” was why she rejected using the Patent and Trademark Office as a forum to fight the Redskins name.

"And I said, ‘I have no idea what you’re talking about,’" Harjo remembered with a laugh. "Once he explained his theory, I was so intrigued by his theory. It was very different from the kinds of things we’d been looking at. … It didn’t interfere with free speech, it wasn’t even forcing a decision. What it’s saying is, ‘Here’s what the federal government will or will not sanction.’ Because, it’s the federal government’s role to grant the exclusive privilege of making money off this name."

Full article

ICYMBI: Raechel’s DetCon1 Convention Schedule

eggplantlit:

Eggplant won’t have a booth at DetCon1, however I’ll be on two panels: 

Quick and Easy Costumes (Friday noon)

Crowdfunding: A New Path to Possibility (Saturday 6 pm)

In case anyone else is going and wants to say “Hi”.

pierced-fattie:

'fat is unhealthy' well k then show me your 'healthy' skinny ass doing it then

pierced-fattie:

'fat is unhealthy' well k then show me your 'healthy' skinny ass doing it then

marvellousmilk:

trebled-negrita-princess:

scumplanet:

geto-cowboy:

darealbrittneyh:

This hasn’t gotten enough recognition

god forbid we actually see something good on the news for once

fucking prodigy man 

Yes young black king! You better go head! 

His name is Stephen R. Stafford and he would have been set to graduate from med school even earlier if there wasn’t a rule that said he had to be 16 to graduate from high school.
He’s also a talented classical pianist - he’s been playing piano since he was two years old.

marvellousmilk:

trebled-negrita-princess:

scumplanet:

geto-cowboy:

darealbrittneyh:

This hasn’t gotten enough recognition

god forbid we actually see something good on the news for once

fucking prodigy man 

Yes young black king! You better go head! 

His name is Stephen R. Stafford and he would have been set to graduate from med school even earlier if there wasn’t a rule that said he had to be 16 to graduate from high school.

He’s also a talented classical pianist - he’s been playing piano since he was two years old.

schrodingers-tribble:

notyour-sidekick:

deerpong:

there’s something very satisfying about buying office supplies but I’m not quite sure how to explain that feeling

the illusion of productivity

that’s it that’s the feeling

Reblog this if you are a cis woman who would defend a trans woman if you saw her being harassed in a public restroom or would accompany her to the restroom so that she could feel safe

sharknadorade:

Because I really need to know how many people would

annabunches:

childhoodreclaimed:

nerdy-trans-girl:

dont-be-stupid-friend:

This is a simple text based game where you play as a young trans person trying to buy some underwear. I made it with the intention of showing cis people what it’s like to be trans. You can play as a trans girl, trans boy, or a nonbinary person. It’s short, so you can play it multiple times for different paths. There are several paths, some better, some worse; if you’re easily triggered by dysphoria or transphobia, you may want to avoid this game. Some paths are safer than others, depending on how well you pass (surprise, surprise). TW for homophobic/transphobic slurs, transphobia/transmisogyny, slurs, misgendering, and possible violence.

I did this just to see how relatable it was, and holy shit it was like someone put me back in the spots i was in only a year ago.  My heart is racing shit. 

ow… my everything hurts…

Hey all my cis followers: this is instructive. Go play it.